AOC Berated, Falsely Accused Border Patrol Agent of Taking Selfies of Her, Memos Say

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (AOC) sobs at a fence supposedly caging illegal immigrant children, but actually next to an empty parking lot.

In this ‘photo op’ from June 24, 2019, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (AOC) sobs in front of a fence supposedly caging immigrant children ‘stolen’ from their parents. In reality, the other side of the fence is a parking lot (shown at bottom of this page). Photo: TheGatewayPundit.com

An “agitated and animated” Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., began “pointing and screaming” at a female agent during a 2019 visit to a Border Patrol station in El Paso, Texas, according to government documents.

“I as a woman of color do not feel safe here,” Ocasio-Cortez told the female agent, according to an official memorandum that summarizes her comments, sometimes using quotation marks.

Ocasio-Cortez said the Border Patrol agent—whose name is redacted in the U.S. Customs and Border Protection documents—used her cellphone to take a photograph of herself with the New York congresswoman in the background.

Ocasio-Cortez went on “to personally admonish and berate” the agent and to insist that “that woman cannot work with children,” according to CBP memos resulting from a Border Patrol investigation of the incident.

Details of the episode are contained in nine pages of documents regarding the July 1, 2019, visit by Ocasio-Cortez and 13 other House Democrats to the Processing Command Center of the federal government’s El Paso station. At the time, Ocasio-Cortez had been in Congress just over six months.

The Daily Signal obtained the documents through a Freedom of Information Act request to Customs and Border Protection, which operates the facility and other stations along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Ocasio-Cortez tweeted later that day that a Border Patrol officer “attacked” her.

The female agent denied Ocasio-Cortez’s accusations, first to her supervisor and later in a written memo the same day. The agent’s supervisor reviewed the agent’s cellphone and found no photos that included Ocasio-Cortez, according to one memo.

Two other Border Patrol agents also said they didn’t see their colleague take any selfies, according to the documents.

The Daily Signal emailed Ocasio-Cortez’s Capitol Hill office for comment May 10, sending messages to two spokespersons as well as the main address for press inquiries. No one from the office had responded by the end of the day. The news website also asked Customs and Border Protection for any updated information on the matter, such as personnel hearings or disciplinary actions. CBP also did not respond immediately.

Most of the House members who visited the El Paso station were, like Ocasio-Cortez, part of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus. The lawmakers’ visit came during the emotionally charged period in which border officials separated children from adults, including their own family, after they unlawfully crossed the border from Mexico.

Ocasio-Cortez chose to skip much of the lawmakers’ tour of the facility and instead visited with female illegal immigrants in a separate area, according to the documents.

“During the briefing, Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez began loudly knocking on the window of the processing area and alleged that a Border Patrol Agent (BPA) was taking a ‘selfie’ photo of her,” says one memo, dated July 2, 2019.

The Border Patrol agent in charge at the time sent this memo describing the 11:45 a.m. incident the day before to Aaron A. Hull, chief Border Patrol agent for the El Paso sector. CBP redacted the names of the accused Border Patrol agent and the agent in charge, as well as other agents mentioned in the memos.

“Rep. Ocasio-Cortez abruptly voiced an allegation that a female agent outside of the REDACTED had just taken a selfie with Rep. Ocasio-Cortez in the background,” the agent in charge said in another memo dated July 2 and sent to the acting agent in charge. “Rep. Ocasio-Cortez not only verbally voiced this concern, she became agitated and animated as she began to bang on the glass, pointing and screaming at the agent.”

“I excused myself from the briefing and addressed the female agent,” explaining what Ocasio-Cortez alleged, the agent in charge wrote. According to the memo, the accused agent “immediately denied taking any photo.”

The accused agent “did admit to having her cell phone in her hand and showed me the current image on the screen,” the agent in charge wrote. “The image appeared to me to be web-based and had nothing to do with interior photos of the detention area.”

According to the memo, the confrontation heated up after the agent in charge spoke with the accused agent. Ocasio-Cortez emerged “to personally admonish and berate” the female agent, “accusing her of unprofessional conduct and asking if she will have future contact with children,” the agent in charge wrote the next day.

“Rep. Ocasio-Cortez voiced that BPA REDACTED should have no contact with children, suggesting her unprofessional conduct (alleged photo) as the reason why,” the memo says.

Ocasio-Cortez tweeted about the incident after it was leaked the same day to the Washington Examiner and the newspaper published a story. Until now, though, details and documents about the altercation have been scarce.

“And to these CBP officers saying they felt ‘threatened’ by me— They were literally discussing making a GoFundMe for an officer who attacked my [sic] on my tour,” Ocasio-Cortez wrote on Twitter. “They confiscated my phone, and they were all armed. I’m 5’4”. They’re just upset I exposed their inhumane behavior.”

It’s not clear whether Ocasio-Cortez, in mentioning the “officer who attacked,” was referring to the female Border Patrol agent whom she accused of taking a selfie with her in the background.

Besides spreading her allegations on Twitter personally, AOC’s staff got in the act. Her spokesman at the time, Corbin Trent, told The Washington Post for a story published the next day, that a Border Patrol agent was trying to take a “stealth selfie” and did so “in a mocking manner.”

The whole story is worth reading at The Daily Signal.

The real view on the other side of the fence AOC is sobbing against.

Shown above is the other side of the fence AOC is depicted at the top of the page sobbing against. Yes, it is a parking lot.

Posted May 11, 2021

Az. Gov. Ducey Declares Gun Shops ‘Essential,’ Protecting Them from Frivolous Lawsuits

Gov. Ducey signs law declaring gun shops essential, protecting them from lawsuits

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey on May 8 signs law declaring gun shops ‘essential,’ protecting them against frivolous lawsuits

Az. Gov. Doug Ducey signed legislation May 8 to protect the Second Amendment rights of Arizonans by safeguarding against frivolous lawsuits that have no connection to unlawful use of firearms. The new state law mirrors federal law that was passed on a bipartisan basis.

Ducey, in his 2020 declaration of the pandemic emergency, had already specifically declared that places where guns and ammo are sold are essential and exempt from any closure requirements due to COVID-19.

“With efforts currently underway in Washington to erode Second Amendment rights, Arizona is taking action to protect those rights,” Gov. Ducey said. “In Arizona, we’re safeguarding manufacturers, sellers and trade associations. Bad actors need to be held accountable, and we will work to make sure they are. But we’re not going to allow lawsuit after lawsuit to slowly tear down the Constitutional rights of law-abiding citizens in our state.

“Senate Bill 1382 achieves this goal, and I’m grateful to Rep. Quang Nguyen and Sen. Wendy Rogers for leading on this important legislation.”

Senate Bill 1382 prohibits the state and all entities of the state from suing a member of the firearms industry for lawful design, marketing, distribution, and sale of firearms and ammunition to the public. The legislation also prohibits a civil action from being brought against a manufacturer or seller of a firearm or ammunition or related trade association for damages resulting from the criminal misuse of the firearm or ammunition, with exceptions.

Additionally, it protects manufacturers or sellers of firearms and ammunition from civil action for damages resulting from the criminal misuse of the firearm or ammunition, except in specified circumstances.

“Arizona is—and will remain—a strong Second Amendment state,” Judi White of Tucson, a champion of gun rights who has long been active in the NRA, told Prescottenews. “We can’t let flippant lawsuits hinder operations of firearm or ammunition manufacturers, sellers and trade associations that are following the law. Senate Bill 1382 makes sure of that. Thank you, Governor Ducey, for signing legislation that protects citizens’ Constitutional rights.”

In 2005, Congress passed the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act (PLCAA) which provides federal protection for law-abiding firearms and ammunition industry members against frivolous lawsuits. PLCAA has been challenged in recent years, including in April 2021 when President Joe Biden stated removing PLCAA as a top priority of his administration. Senate Bill 1382 codifies the federal provisions under state law.

Additional Information at BearingArms.com

Posted May 10, 2021

Arizona Bans Post-Election Signature ‘Fix’ for Unsigned Mail-in Ballots

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey signed a law that bans voters from adding signatures on unsigned mail-in ballots after Election Day.

The measure, Arizona Senate Bill 1003 (S.B. 1003), was approved earlier in the state legislature in party-line votes with Republicans in favor and Democrats opposed.

mail truck delivers ballots for dems

The new law codifies a ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit on Oct. 6, 2020, within one month of the 2020 election. It also ended disputes over unsigned mail-in ballots between the state Republicans and Democrats.

Current Arizona law allows election officials to contact voters to fix the signatures on the ballots if the signatures don’t match other signatures from records in the Department of Motor Vehicle, voter registration forms, or previous early ballots. The voters can fix the signatures, if they failed to pass the verification process, within up to five business days after Election Day.

While the new law didn’t change anything about the grace period for the signed ballots, it ended state Democrats’ efforts to add a similar grace period to unsigned ballots.

According to The Epoch Times, Hobbs’s move is part of efforts to honor a settlement in 2019 with the Navajo Nation, which would allow tribal voters with mismatched or missing signatures on mail-in ballots to correct their ballots with five business days after Election Day.

However, the efforts were stopped by appeals court judges who said, in alignment with the state Republicans, that the Democrats went too far by giving absentee voters five days after Election Day to correct missing signatures on mail-in ballots.

“All ballots must have some deadline, and it is reasonable that Arizona has chosen to make that deadline Election Day itself so as to promote its unquestioned interest in administering an orderly election and to facilitate its already burdensome job of collecting, verifying, and counting all of the votes in timely fashion,” the appellate court said.

The new law codified the appeal court’s ruling by adding an amendment to the current Arizona election law. The amendment requires all mail-in ballots to be delivered to the county recorder, other officers in charge of the election, or polling sites no later than 7 p.m. on Election Day.

“The ballot will not be counted without the voter’s signature on the envelope,” reads the amendment.

Another amendment in the new law required election officers to contact the voter if the signature is missing on the ballot. The deadline for adding a signature to a ballot should be no later than 7 p.m. on Election Day.

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer had urged Ducey to veto the measure, saying it would undermine the 2019 settlement.

Donald Trump Launches His Own Communication Platform, Bypassing the Tech Dictocracy

Donald Trump launches a new website

After months of being banned from social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook, former President Donald Trump this week launched a new communications platform where he will be able to communicate directly with his followers.

The new platform, called “From the Desk of Donald J. Trump,” can be found at www.DonaldJTrump.com/desk. Users can see posts, images, and videos from Trump and share them to social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. (We don’t know if the media dictocracy will ban such posts or the posters.) The site currently does not yet have a way for users to comment or interact with the posts on the platform.

Trump has already added a few posts to the site, including a video introducing users to the new platform that promises to be “straight from the desk of Donald J. Trump.”

The technology appears to be powered by Campaign Nucleus— the “digital ecosystem made for efficiently managing political campaigns and organizations,” created by his former campaign manager, Brad Parscale, according to Fox News.

“President Trump’s website is a great resource to find his latest statements and highlights from his first term in office, but this is not a new social media platform,” senior advisor Jason Miller told Fox News. “We’ll have additional information coming on that front in the very near future.”

President Trump’s website was launched May 4, the day before Facebook’s “oversight board” decided to continue suspending Trump from Facebook and Instagram for at least another six months.

Facebook moved to block Trump “indefinitely” after the Jan. 6 riot in the U.S. Capitol, with CEO Mark Zuckerberg saying that they “believe the risks of allowing the President to continue to use our service during this period are simply too great.”

Trump is permanently banned from Twitter for daring to attempt to counter the Democratic Party narrative.

The President of Syrian President Bashar Hafez al-Assad and Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei still are allowed to post on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Posted May 5, 2021