GOP Chair Elise Stefanik: Justice Department Is ‘Trying to Block’ Maricopa County Audit

Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-N.Y.), who was recently elected as the House Republican Conference chair, said the Department of Justice’s questions about the Maricopa County, Arizona, audit of the 2020 election may be unconstitutional.

On May 5, the Justice Department sent a letter to Arizona Senate leader Karen Fann, a Republican, inquiring about the custody of the ballots under review by a group of private contractors, alleging that the group’s other processes—including the canvassing of addresses—could be considered “voter intimidation.”

Rep. Elise Stefanik (R.-NY)

“I support that audit,” Stefanik said after being asked about it in a Fox Business interview on May 16. “Transparency is good for the American people. And again, this should be a nonpartisan issue, whether you are Republican, Democrat, independent, or conservative, transparency is important, and the audit was passed by the Arizona state Senate.”

Stefanik later said that the “Biden Department of Justice is trying to block that audit,” which, she said, “is unconstitutional from my perspective.”

“Our states, constitutionally, are responsible for writing states’ constitution law,” she said.

Pamela Karlan, principal deputy assistant attorney general with the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, wrote to Fann that “the proposed work of the audit raises concerns regarding potential intimidation of voters.”

Fann replied that the plan by election auditors to verify the validity of certain voters had been placed on hold.

“If and to the extent the Senate subsequently decides that canvassing is necessary to the successful completion of the audit, its vendor will implement detailed requirements to ensure that the canvassing is conducted in a manner that complies fully with the commands of the United States Constitution and federal and state civil rights laws,” Fann wrote earlier this month.

The Epoch Times reports that Stefanik’s comments on May 16 came just days after Dominion Voting Systems and Maricopa County officials said they wouldn’t provide passwords for election machines in Maricopa County. Dominion said it would comply with the audit, but that Cyber Ninjas—the company hired by the Arizona state Senate—isn’t accredited by the U.S. Election Assistance Commission.

Stefanik was approved last week in a vote by House Republicans to become the Republican Conference chair—the party’s No. 3 position in the House. She took over after GOP lawmakers voted to remove Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.), a frequent critic of former President Donald Trump and other Republicans, from the position.

Posted May 17, 2021

Vote ‘NO’ on Proposition 208

Proposition 208 is the wrong plan at the wrong time. It will have far-reaching negative impacts on our economy and cause further damage to small businesses as they continue to battle back from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Passing the largest tax increase in Arizona history at our most vulnerable time is the wrong strategy!

Worse, Proposition 208 is being bankrolled by out-of-state special interest groups that are attempting to raise our taxes to the TOP TEN HIGHEST in the country, while ignoring the devastating impacts that will have on our economy.

Some Key Facts About Prop. 208, “Invest in Education Act”

Proposition 208 increases the top individual state income tax rate from the current 4.5% to 8% — a 77.7% increase, vaulting Arizona into the top-10-highest income tax rates in the country. The tax increase dramatically undermines Arizona’s welcoming environment for small businesses, which pay their taxes on the individual portion of the tax code, not the corporate tax code. Fifty percent of taxpayers whose tax rates will be directly targeted are small business owners. (Source: Goldwater Institute.)

“If Proposition 208 passes, small businesses will pay a higher top tax rate than big business—even the Fortune 500—but you wouldn’t know that by watching the proponents’ ads,” No on Prop. 208 Chairman Jaime Molera said.  “The proponents’ ads fail to disclose that Proposition 208 won’t do anything to enhance teachers’ base pay. That’s because the initiative relies on the most volatile slice of tax revenues. No school district would base its budgets and teacher contracts on such an unpredictable source.”

The proposition would funnel millions of dollars into the educational system — yes, system, not classrooms. Tax money collected via Prop. 208 “would be placed in the student support and safety fund, to be used first to pay the administrative costs of implementing, administering and enforcing the measure…”

Whatever is leftover then would be divided by formula via grants to school districts, charter schools, the state education system, etc. “The grant monies could be used for a variety of purposes,” so don’t be surprised if your tax money is used to fund new curriculum in subjects you disagree with. (1619 Project, anyone?)

VOTE “NO” on Proposition 208.