House Democrats Make Pre-emptive Strike, Announce ‘Investigation’ of Arizona Election Audit

House Democrats on July 14 announced that they will be “investigating” the ongoing audit of the 2020 election centered around Arizona’s Maricopa County, which Joe Biden “won” by about 10,000 votes.

Dead voters (Marolis and Cox, Townhall Media 2021)

From Margolis and Cox, Townhall Media

“In a letter addressed to the CEO of Cyber Ninjas, the firm hired to conduct the audit, Democrats belittled the effort, attempted to discredit it, and pronounced that any questioning of the election results was a ‘big lie’ that’s already been debunked,” reports Townhall.com.

The letter, linked below, makes a number of largely baseless, obviously partisan charges against Cyber Ninja in a clear attempt to preemptively discredit whatever report they end up delivering. Toward the end of the letter, House Democrats demand a series of documents, including training materials given to those conducting the audit. It appears they want basically everything the company has ever recorded, which is likely an attempt to intimidate and inundate the company with information requests.

House Dems demand tons of info.

LINK to Complete Letter HERE.

The House Dems also want all communications with former President Donald J. Trump, his officials, and any campaign figures. The letter is signed by Carolyn Maloney and Jamie Raskin, the latter of which, ironically, objected to the certification of Trump’s presidential win in 2016.

“The real question is why now?” asks Townhall’s Bonchie. “This audit has been going on for a while. With a report nearing completion, the rush to try to preemptively tear it down before even seeing the first piece of evidence is too clever by half. It smacks of fear that something may actually have been found that would prove fraud occurred.”

CBP Officers Seize $1.4 Million in Hard Narcotics at Laredo Port of Entry

LAREDO, Texas—U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Office of Field Operations (OFO) officers seized hard narcotics in four separate, unrelated incidents that totaled over $1,400,000 in street value.

The first seizure occurred on June 28 at the Juarez-Lincoln Bridge, after a CBP officer referred a 2007 Cadillac Escalade arriving from Mexico for a secondary inspection. Following inspection by a canine and a non-intrusive imaging system, officers discovered packages containing 7.8 pounds of alleged cocaine and packages containing 2.51 pounds of alleged methamphetamine within the drivers’ personal belongings.

Packages containing methamphetamine, cocaine and fentanyl valued at more than $958,000 seized by CBP officers at World Trade Bridge.

Packages containing methamphetamine, cocaine and fentanyl valued at more than $958,000 seized by CBP officers at World Trade Bridge.

The narcotics had an estimated street value of $110,444.

The second enforcement action that same day occurred at the World Trade Bridge, after CBP officers assigned to the cargo facility encountered a daily express consignment truck arriving from Mexico. The 2020 Freightliner and shipment were referred for a follow-up inspection that resulted in the discovery of 11.11 pounds of alleged methamphetamine within the shipment. The narcotics had an estimated street value of $222,223.

The third enforcement action occurred at the World Trade Bridge later that evening, after CBP officers encountered a tractor manifesting a shipment of plastic scrap arriving from Mexico. The 2020 International tractor and shipment were referred for a canine and non-intrusive imaging system inspection, resulting in the discovery of packages containing 19.75 pounds of alleged methamphetamine, 32.67 pounds of alleged cocaine and 22.88 pounds of alleged fentanyl within the shipment. The narcotics had an estimated street value of $958,404.

The fourth enforcement action occurred on June 29th at the World Trade Bridge after CBP officers encountered a daily express consignment truck arriving from Mexico. The 2011 Freightliner and shipment were referred for a canine and non-intrusive imaging system inspection, resulting in the discovery of 7.05 pounds of alleged methamphetamine within the shipment. The narcotics had an estimated street value of $141,094.

The four interceptions have a combined street value of $1,432,165.

CBP seized the narcotics. The cases were turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement-Homeland Security Investigations (ICE-HSI) special agents for further investigation.

“In an effort to secure our Nation’s borders, as these narcotics seizures clearly illustrate, CBP has implemented enforcement strategies that have furthered the disruption of dangerous drugs entering the country,” said Port Director Alberto Flores, Laredo Port of Entry.

Supreme Court upholds Arizona voting rules, including ballot harvesting ban

The U.S. Supreme Court on July 1 upheld two Republican-supported Arizona voting laws the legislators say are intended to ensure election integrity.

The decision, delivered by a 6-3 court split on ideological lines, found that neither law violated Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act and that they were not enacted with racially discriminatory intent. Justice Samuel Alito wrote the court’s majority opinion. Justice Elena Kagan led the leftists on the court in dissent.

People with identification are not scarce

The Arizona Republican Party and the Democratic National Committee have been feuding over the laws since before the 2016 presidential election. The case received renewed attention in the aftermath of the 2020 election after many Americans said that coronavirus-era voting provisions, some later found to have been enacted illegally, had unfairly tilted the election to the Democrats.

The laws, approved long before the 2020 election, require that a ballot be thrown out if it was cast in a precinct other than the one matching the voter’s home address. The laws also ban “ballot harvesting,” in which third-party carriers such as unions and activist groups collect absentee ballots and deliver them for counting. Passed in 2016, Arizona H.B. 2023, makes it a felony for anyone other than a family member, caregiver or postal worker to collect and deliver ballots.

The second Arizona law in question requires ballots to be cast in the assigned precinct where a voter lives. If a voter casts a provisional ballot at the wrong polling place, election officials will reject it.

According to the Washington Examiner, “Democrats claimed that the laws are racist because they could disproportionately affect black, Latino, and Native American populations. The DNC, in its brief, called Arizona’s out-of-precinct policy one of the ‘most punishing in the nation’ and accused it of effectively disenfranchising more than 38,000 voters since 2008. It also alleged that the ballot harvesting ban took voting rights away from minorities who rely on third-party carriers to vote.”

In a 2005 bipartisan report, former President Jimmy Carter, a Democrat, and former Secretary of State James Baker, a Republican, recommended prohibiting ballot collection. Critics of ballot harvesting can also point to a race in Patterson, New Jersey last year in which candidates were indicted on fraud charges after they mishandled collected ballots.  They were indicted on charges of election fraud, fraud in casting mail-in votes, unauthorized possession of ballots, tampering with public records and falsifying records. Patterson City Councilman Alex Mendez also was indicted for alleged false voter registration.

The Supreme Court’s decision overturns the San Francisco-based U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, which found that Arizona’s regulations had a disproportionate impact on Native American, Latino and Black voters and that it was enacted in a broader context of voter discrimination.

Posted July 1, 2021